We've just launched our map. Add yourself by clicking here!

close

Blogpost: What Is Planned Obsolescence?

Tagged: 

This topic contains 29 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  hannahdelavel123 4 years ago.

0
Dave Hakkens davehakkens

Blogpost: What Is Planned Obsolescence?

18/12/2013 at 17:31

Read our newest blogpost about planned obsolescence and share your thoughts!

29 replies
0 subscribers
0 saved
likes
sort on most likes
18/12/2013 at 18:49
0

I think it’ll be difficult to get a good variety of companies to change their views on “planned obsolescence”. They make too much money off of it to just give it up. Though I’m sure some companies will be willing to tone it down some in the name of innovation.

18/12/2013 at 22:46
0

I hope the same thing will not be with the phoneblocks smartphones.The main idea of this project is to avoid obsolescence

19/12/2013 at 01:04
0

Even if Phonebloks phones ended up with “accidental” obsolescence it would be extremely easy to swap out whatever part needs it. So when this idea comes out, there won’t be a need to worry.

new
19/12/2013 at 01:09
0

You can probably expect you apple Bloks breaking around a year after you get it when the second model comes out.

19/12/2013 at 01:36
0

This is exactly the reason why I was still slightly sceptical about the phonebloks idea when I heard the first time about it: A phone for the rest of your life? I’m sure everybody who joined this community wants this and I guess there are a lot of people who do not know about phonebloks yet but are potential buyers. Although there are also people who need this constant change (Not the “change” apple deceives people with).I will try to avoid repeating all the aspects of the blogpost but it already says that there could be a conflict with the capitalist system/ market company that will invest and expect to profit in producing such a phone. Certainly nobody believes that if this will work out, there will be a “perfect kit with the highest technical input” which lasts forever. Presumably it is more likely to achieve the goals if you follow the hint from the blogpost about the broken camera and allow some parts to become obsolete. Not like the hard-to-get lens motor and as expensive as a new ink cartridge, where you can get a new (maybe even) better printer for the money. But an affordable exchange for the broken part which might be also mechanically damaged. For this reason repair parts are necessary anyway. The beautiful, original idea can be preserved which is also about exchanging the blocks without getting the dull recommendation to buy a completely new smartphone.

19/12/2013 at 07:45
0

I think its great to hear big corporations putting this out in the open, to me that says that the Phoneblok project is going to make an effort to stray away from it. It is a very annoying feature for consumers and yet it is not something that we can’t really prove when buying a product but any DVD machine / camera / electronic gadget made in present time has a built in time-clock and it can be guaranteed to stop functioning without a valid reason after having the product for several months. All the Fridges / TVs we had in the house as kids are still here, they still work and we still use them and that’s a good 25 years ago a lot of those products were not yet infected by planned obsolescence. Yes, they might not look as sleek and elegant as products released today but they function even better. Breeding loyalty among ones targeted client area is a key feature in creating a following and where the “old-school” products have the disadvantage of not needing any upgrades Phonebloks have the advantage of being multi-component based systems so there will always be a need to component to get for your Phoneblok dependent on the consumer. It’s the best of both world, let’s step away from this planned obsolescence

helper
19/12/2013 at 09:50
0

katashnikov wrote: This is exactly the reason why I was still slightly sceptical about the phonebloks idea when I heard the first time about it: A phone for the rest of your life? I’m sure everybody who joined this community wants this and I guess there are a lot of people who do not know about phonebloks yet but are potential buyers. Although there are also people who need this constant change (Not the “change” apple deceives people with).I will try to avoid repeating all the aspects of the blogpost but it already says that there could be a conflict with the capitalist system/ market company that will invest and expect to profit in producing such a phone. Certainly nobody believes that if this will work out, there will be a “perfect kit with the highest technical input” which lasts forever. Presumably it is more likely to achieve the goals if you follow the hint from the blogpost about the broken camera and allow some parts to become obsolete. Not like the hard-to-get lens motor and as expensive as a new ink cartridge, where you can get a new (maybe even) better printer for the money. But an affordable exchange for the broken part which might be also mechanically damaged. For this reason repair parts are necessary anyway. The beautiful, original idea can be preserved which is also about exchanging the blocks without getting the dull recommendation to buy a completely new smartphone. You are right in that planned obsolescence (PO) is built in deep within our market economy. Just looking at a possible lifecycle of a mobile phone being 4 years instead of 2, would, in theory, give the company half the income it had, and in that probably go broke. That is, if they can’t find any other way to make money. So, PO will probably have to be phased out. It took about 80 years for it to get this big, let’s give it 40 to be abolished.All companies might not be willing to change there whole structure to make this happen. But I’m sure that some companies will want to, at least, cooperate for this to happen. One argument here being that they do not want to be seen as the bad guy when e-waste streams keep growing and blame is to be dished out. (Classic white or green washing, I know.) Further, there will be new companies and/or organizations, such as Phonebloks, willing to build the whole company structure around stuff not PO, and in that, give us a higher possibility of succeeding in this venture.It is obvious that a phone like Phonebloks also will brake, but not from PO. It will break because you might drop it from your balcony or run it over with your car. You might forget it somewhere, or just loose it to the sea. Or, the memory blok might be too small for all your movies. There will be ways for a company doing a phone with no PO to make money, or at least have enough turnover to keep the company going.

19/12/2013 at 18:01
0

More upgrades would mean more money for the OEM, which shouldn’t steer them away from this project.Instead of the entire device getting outdated or broken, the phone’s components would be the ones that eventually break. However being that smaller pieces would be easier to replace or upgrade than the entire thing, as well as cheaper on the short run, people would go rushing for even the smallest upgrade (like +100 MHz CPU or +0.2 megapixel camera) which would replace the old one that still works simply because it’s better. The planned obsolescence would still be there, only on a different scale.Allow me to give an example that would help clear my point:I have the nexus 4 phone. Being the upgrade freak that I am, I probably would’ve bought a new RAM module the first month after I got the phone , the following month a new CPU, then a better camera and on and on. Buying a new phone in its entirety would be too much money at once for me, and that is why after the nexus 5 released I still have the old nexus 4. But buying a component each month is cheaper, and I would be inclined to do it. So for customers like me, and I trust I’m not the only one with this mindset in the world, an OEM would make a lot more money, making Phonebloks a good investment.

23/12/2013 at 10:59
0

chipster wrote: I think it’ll be difficult to get a good variety of companies to change their views on “planned obsolescence”. They make too much money off of it to just give it up. Though I’m sure some companies will be willing to tone it down some in the name of innovation. hey, but i think our generation is on agood way to realize that planned obsolescence isnt good anymore for our planet and us as well too. so i think we should build up an remove- or refurbish-system for used or damaged bloks.

helper
24/12/2013 at 16:39
0

florynRAF wrote: But buying a component each month is cheaper, and I would be inclined to do it. So for customers like me, and I trust I’m not the only one with this mindset in the world, an OEM would make a lot more money, making Phonebloks a good investment. I agree that modularity can spurn the economy on, and that it does not have to be a bad thing for producing companies. However, with mores law, I think that customers always wanting the best will get fewer and fewer in favour of costumers asking what do I need.

helper
24/12/2013 at 16:39
0

ShellshockingNoise wrote: i think we should build up an remove- or refurbish-system for used or damaged bloks. Good idea!

24/12/2013 at 20:53
0

TomasHalberstad wrote: Good idea!but a pretty hard thing.. :/

02/01/2014 at 16:58
0

I’m not sure whether obsolescence is really planned as such, but I suspect that it is more that products are engineered such that they are as cheap to build as possible, where possible means ‘keep working until it leaves the shop and then abit more’. The driving force for this is not just greedy kapitalism, but also the fact that if you would invest in durability, the price of your product would rise in comparison with the competition, while consumers are not (in large quantities) aware of or willing to pay for durability, and you go out of business.I also think we don’t have to convice all major handset vendors to adopt this new phonebloks paradigm. When one major vendor does so and it catches on, then independent Blok vendors will latch on (figuratively and literally) creating a new ecosystem that will allow smaller companies to flourish and may push older players to either play along or perish.

02/01/2014 at 19:32
0

Planned Obsolescence are much worse on current electronic devices. According to my experience, electronic devices bought decades ago lasts much longer than the current electronic devices. My old feature phone can last for more than 6 years (until now), but my smartphone lasted for only 2 years. It’s the same with my refrigerator.The next thing I realized that “a specific android smartphone brand” release good software updates only for the first few months. After more than a year, the updates get more and more buggy with much worse performance. I’ve ever compared 2 same phones from different types, one with an old firmware, the other one with the newest firmware. The phone with the old firmware performs much better than the one with the new firmware. This tricks consumer into thinking that the phone is too old and it’s time to change into a new phone. It’s not because the phone is too old for the new OS, another phone from another brand with a much lower spec performs much better than that phone I compared, with the same OS.

helper
12/01/2014 at 13:57
0

Philbert wrote: I’m not sure whether obsolescence is really planned as such. It is planned. In several senses. The most common being just stopping making spare parts for it.

15/01/2014 at 20:20
0

i think we cant really say that the opsolescence of products is planned – but we can be pretty sure that developersare not inrtressted in to make thier product last as long as possible.

05/02/2014 at 09:48
0

Look ive been buying phones for years, ive had a phone since 9years old and in all honesty its true I was getting a new phone every year just cause . New phone came out . You guys should make this phone with Samsung and Google the Galaxy series of phones is on the top of the market …AMAZING concept though guys

helper
05/02/2014 at 11:42
0

ShellshockingNoise wrote: i think we cant really say that the opsolescence of products is planned – but we can be pretty sure that developersare not inrtressted in to make thier product last as long as possible. That’s one of the main things in Planned obsolescence. It is a thing! The most usual character of it is manufacturers not providing spare parts or making the product not possible to update software wise. I assure you, both of these things are planned.

17/02/2014 at 10:11
0

If phonebloks are going to be released, other major companies such as Samsung, apple, nokia and many others will be highly competitive about this. They will release more and more phonebloks which are going to get better and better. However, that means that the people will still waste money on the better products. So the phoneblok needs to team up with all these major companies. The development that those different companies that will be made should not be for the new phones but it should be for the new software updates.Anyways if the phonebloks are going to be successful there are a few ideas I would suggest about the blocks. first of all many people lose their phones, some who are unlucky lose them when they are out of charge so you can’t call on it. So why not make a block which will be connected to some piece of wearable tech on which will be able to find your device even if it is out of charge. So for example it will give you a map and a point on the map showing where your phoneblok is.

17/02/2014 at 10:22
0

ShellshockingNoise wrote: i think we cant really say that the opsolescence of products is planned – but we can be pretty sure that developersare not inrtressted in to make thier product last as long as possible. yes, the idea for them is obviously to make money but as I said the development of the new phones should be stopped, and they just need to make money from developing new updates or making blocks for he phone.

17/02/2014 at 10:23
0

1BakexCake wrote: Look ive been buying phones for years, ive had a phone since 9years old and in all honesty its true I was getting a new phone every year just cause . New phone came out . You guys should make this phone with Samsung and Google the Galaxy series of phones is on the top of the market …AMAZING concept though guys

17/02/2014 at 10:37
0

1BakexCake wrote: Look ive been buying phones for years, ive had a phone since 9years old and in all honesty its true I was getting a new phone every year just cause . New phone came out . You guys should make this phone with Samsung and Google the Galaxy series of phones is on the top of the market …AMAZING concept though guysI do not really agree with that, if the phonebloks are going to be made with companies such as Samsung and google they will just keep on releasing new phones every year making it better each time. The idea of the phonebloks in my opinion is that the phoneblok can become better by upgrading the blocks or the software. They are designed to last but people will keep on wasting money on new phones which are better than pevious ones, that is why phonebloks are going to be a major change for a majority of companies. The new phonebloks are going to be made some time after because the technology changes, e.g: before it used to be buttons on phones, now it is touch screen then it will be air control or eye control or anything else. That is when the phonebloks are going to be remade because that is when you cant change it with a block or a software update, that is when they are going to remake the system.

17/02/2014 at 10:39
0

ShellshockingNoise wrote: hey, but i think our generation is on agood way to realize that planned obsolescence isnt good anymore for our planet and us as well too. so i think we should build up an remove- or refurbish-system for used or damaged bloks. it would be quite cool if you wont have to buy a new block if one does not work or isn’t suitable for you, but to upgrade it through the system

19/03/2014 at 15:40
0

Being an American, I am sadly aware of my fellow citizens’ desires of wanting the “next big thing”: newer, quicker phones with bigger memories and more battery life. This concept of “planned obsolescence”, i.e. “out with the old, in with the new”, for me, is unsettling. We as consumers have a horrible track record on keeping our hazardous waste out of landfills, or worse yet, we ship it off to 3rd world countries for pennies on the ton to be sorted by poor, unassuming people. These people sort our hazardous, unwanted waste for recycling in deplorable conditions, causing harm to themselves (these electronic wastes are highly hazardous, full of mercury, lead, and the like) and their own environments. America doesn’t have very strong or enforced recycling laws, so this is the the status quo (for now). As a child, I used to play with Legos, and I always marveled at how infinite the possibilities were on making ANYTHING from them: ships, cars, boats, spaceships, people, sculptures, etc. This idea of being able to basically construct a phone that can be forever upgraded and kept out of a landfill or waste stream is paramount to a sustainable future if we are going to continue living on this only piece of rock in the universe we call “home”. Sure, maybe your company won’t be flush with billionaires in the next few years, but then, neither will I. But, we do all have to share this lonely chunk of rock, and if we are going to continue keeping Earth alive for future generations, we must begin securing her future NOW, and this is definitely a step in the right direction. Scalability and design issues will be solved, just as they have in years past. We have seen, just in a few decades, computers go from room-sized behemoths to something you can fit in the palm of your hand. Advances in components (i.e. quantum computing, cloud storage, etc) and materials (graphene as a conductor, OLED’s for displays) will make this device possible, no matter what its final look will be. I would strongly suggest using a closed loop system for all materials, and advertise this fact as a selling point. Using sustainable, recyclable materials and a forward-thinking approach to design would make me feel proud to own one. (Maybe even call it the the “Ephone” (for earth), or infiniphone. Just some suggestions 🙂 Regardless, I will be very interested to see how this whole idea pans out, as I am very strongly in favor of the idea as a whole. Good luck and best wishes, I only hope the best for your company.

helper
20/03/2014 at 14:08
0

infinite_lego wrote: Being an American, I am sadly aware of my fellow citizens’ desires of wanting the “next big thing”: newer, quicker phones with bigger memories and more battery life. This concept of “planned obsolescence”, i.e. “out with the old, in with the new”, for me, is unsettling. We as consumers have a horrible track record on keeping our hazardous waste out of landfills, or worse yet, we ship it off to 3rd world countries for pennies on the ton to be sorted by poor, unassuming people. These people sort our hazardous, unwanted waste for recycling in deplorable conditions, causing harm to themselves (these electronic wastes are highly hazardous, full of mercury, lead, and the like) and their own environments. America doesn’t have very strong or enforced recycling laws, so this is the the status quo (for now). As a child, I used to play with Legos, and I always marveled at how infinite the possibilities were on making ANYTHING from them: ships, cars, boats, spaceships, people, sculptures, etc. This idea of being able to basically construct a phone that can be forever upgraded and kept out of a landfill or waste stream is paramount to a sustainable future if we are going to continue living on this only piece of rock in the universe we call “home”. Sure, maybe your company won’t be flush with billionaires in the next few years, but then, neither will I. But, we do all have to share this lonely chunk of rock, and if we are going to continue keeping Earth alive for future generations, we must begin securing her future NOW, and this is definitely a step in the right direction. Scalability and design issues will be solved, just as they have in years past. We have seen, just in a few decades, computers go from room-sized behemoths to something you can fit in the palm of your hand. Advances in components (i.e. quantum computing, cloud storage, etc) and materials (graphene as a conductor, OLED’s for displays) will make this device possible, no matter what its final look will be. I would strongly suggest using a closed loop system for all materials, and advertise this fact as a selling point. Using sustainable, recyclable materials and a forward-thinking approach to design would make me feel proud to own one. (Maybe even call it the the “Ephone” (for earth), or infiniphone. Just some suggestions 🙂 Regardless, I will be very interested to see how this whole idea pans out, as I am very strongly in favor of the idea as a whole. Good luck and best wishes, I only hope the best for your company. We are on the same page with you regarding everything you write. Great to have your support.

starter
20/03/2014 at 15:23
0

little OT infinite_lego wrote: wanting the “next big thing”: newer, quicker phones with bigger memories and more battery life. ] did you remember the old gsm battery duration ? By my side wasn’t less htan the phones of today.

starter
06/04/2014 at 12:28
0

just for knowledge, may be contain some useful information for who can understand.http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2014/jan/13/integrated-quantum-circuit-is-most-complex-everPS I post here cose it’s the most recent post that talk about Quantum

04/12/2014 at 18:40
0

In France, planned obsolescence will now be legally considered as fraud and can be punished by up to 2 years in jail and a 300,000 € fine.I couldn’t find an article in English which talks extensively about it, but the life span of any product equivalent to 30% of the minimum wage will have to be displayed. Also, the retailer will have to inform the consumer about how long spare parts are available on the market and warranties will be upgraded from 1 to 2 years.Source (French): http://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2014/10/15/l-obsolescence-programmee-des-produits-desormais-sanctionnee_4506580_3244.html

21/01/2015 at 10:15
0

Something that is obsolete is old, out-dated, and no longer serves a purpose. But, when a non-perishable product, like an electronic device for example, is designed to fail after a certain period of time, we call this planned obsolescence. Here’s a familiar scenario: the washer or television breaks down, so an individual calls the producer for a spare part. However, they are informed the part isn’t really made anymore, so they’ll have to just purchase a new one. That’s called planned obsolescence and it is included in just about any product one can name. Read more: http://personalmoneynetwork.com/moneyblog/2012/08/30/planned-obsolescence/

Viewing 29 replies - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Support our projects on Patreon so we can keep developing 💪