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Machines operational capacity, cost & continuous?

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Terry Springer 4 months ago.

2
Eric irotom

Machines operational capacity, cost & continuous?

17/02/2019 at 14:48

Hi guys. How are we doing? I’m Eric and I’ve just joined this community because it seems very useful for people & environment and exactly aligned with what we try to achieve.

We are working on the project connecting plastic with blockchain: plastic will be remade into goods useful for local community (eg. bricks or piping – like what you do here) while blockchain will be used to incentivise people with token for good behaviour and store information of what is happening where & when:
You can see more on it here: https://itoma.co.uk/2ocean.

We’ve seen the machines that can be built. We have a couple of questions using collective knowledge & experience of our community please:

1. What is the maximum operational capacity of this 4 system machines? So basically – what is the biggest one you ever constructed (or perhaps it is just one size)?
https://preciousplastic.com/en/machines.html
For shredder?
For extruder?
For injection?
For “squeezer” (ok, ok – compression machine ;-)?

2. What was approximately cost of the biggest system that you build?
Cost per machine please?

3. For each of those 4 machines – Is it a continuous process – so basically can we add plastic continuously to each of the machine during operations or is it more of “do it once, wait an hour, do it again, wait an hour”, etc (that’s what we call a batch process ;-)?
Summarizing – which of those machines have continuous operations and which ones are batch?

This will help us a lot and if there is anyone here in Hatfield / North London, UK then we can connect and take it from there.
We can add value on innovation, funding & connections. We are looking for people interested in machinery building & (eventually) blockchain.
So let’s take it from there guys and have a good day ahead.

Thanks,
Eric

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starter
17/02/2019 at 16:11
3

i think if you search the forum you can get some of the information you want.

shredder : continuous but tedious, last numbers I’ve seen were about 30 KG the day, washing not included. i’d rather recommend to search for ‘plastic granulator’ on ebay or aliexpress, these crushers outperform the PP shredder by miles in terms of efficiency and capacity
extrusion : continuous, quite easy going if you have enough molds with an easy to plug connection
injection: batch, it can take up to 30+ mins. to make one piece, the more molds you have the better
compression: batch, up to one or two hours

material bill (new parts), excluding excessive labor cost :
– shredder: 1500 Euro, 4 Kw (double power of the average shredders here)
– extrusion: 700 Euro – 1000 Euro, 2 Kw
– injection: 300 Euro
– compression : 200 Euro

there are couple of new machines around, developed by the community. when it comes to plastic, you will also have to consider : sheet press, vacuum table, blow table, pizza oven, hydraulic press, etc… etcetera

you can easily double those numbers to get this done right 🙂 and, needless to say i hope, that are still hobby machines, nothing really fitted to save the world 🙂 if you look throughout, please check machine markets first. there is plenty of more bum for your bang 😉

g

starter
17/02/2019 at 16:45
1

well, when it comes to man power, you will need 2-3 people willing to work under relative hazardous conditions (fixable with big $$), doing tedious work, and 1-2 people with a really unique (expensive) skill set who do new machines, make upgrades, maintenance , molds and new product/production designs all day long :-). you also don’t want some bollocks doing this important part. anyways, so it’s easily 10k one-time invest for those semi-hobby/professional machines and another 10k + for other machines to make molds and product development, well and the labor fees, rent, insurance, permissions, licenses, etc..

looking at all this, it’s a little weird to see the huge overlap with traditional manufactures who create all plastic products in the first place; with basically only one difference, trying to be the antidote. i couldn’t get my around this ‘precious’ thing yet 🙂

good luck

starter
03/03/2019 at 11:25
1

Hi Eric,
We are based in Wembley, interesting in meeting you. We are a looking to get started. Will be great to meet you and talk.

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