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Research shredder

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  rich balauro 4 years ago.

1
Dave Hakkens davehakkens

Research shredder

10/06/2015 at 08:50

Share here all your information, suggestions inspiration for a shredder. The more information we gather the better the machine will get.

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In reply to: Research shredder

03/06/2014 at 09:45
1

Marcus Thymark from Germany has been busy developing an open-source shredder, he also sells them.
https://grabcad.com/library/mini-shredder–1

He’s also working on a qualitative 3D-filament maker named FilaMaker:
http://filamaker.eu/
https://www.facebook.com/FilaMaker

In reply to: Research shredder

warrior
04/06/2014 at 14:40
0

Great project, thanks for sharing!

In reply to: Research shredder

19/09/2014 at 22:15
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Hi Dave,
How is it going with the shredder?? how can I help?

In reply to: Research shredder

21/11/2014 at 12:46
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I love the shredder SIemen!

In reply to: Research shredder

17/12/2014 at 20:20
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With Marcus’s shredder, if you see the construction videos, he used a hexagonal chrome-vanadium steel bar for the shafts that the blades were mounted on, so hard that there were no dies he could thread the ends with, and had to wear down expensive tools on a high-end metal lathe in order to construct these.
The shredder ends up being a very solid over-engineered machine (see the test shredding a mobile phone, and on that site he says these parts are capable of shredding metal). For the simple purpose of shredding plastic sheets and failed prints though, I think we could make this cheaper and more accessible.

While I would keep the blades the same, the box-frame holding the bearings could easily be built out of wood, the gears could be cut from plates the same thickness as the blades, and the shafts could possibly be made from studding/allthreads with nuts to drive the blades. That last part I am least sure of though – I’m trying to find out how much torque something like a cheap M10 BZP mild steel thread can withstand. They could be welded or brazed to the shaft for increased strength.
I made a start on drawing up such a timber frame and modified blades some months back but never got round to finishing it; having found this site gives me a reason to.

In reply to: Research shredder

02/01/2015 at 23:37
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Hello to all,

I by trade am a carpenter who at a time a few years ago had to resort to other areas of work due too the economy. I ended up becoming a mold Tec in a plastics factory and although enjoyed it the 9 months there resorted back to my passion. Plus the money wasnt there.
Anyhow, I learned enough too be highly inspired in this as a hobby. I will begin to build a shredder using a concept similar to the granulators I used. My best thought right now is based off the wood planer. It has the same motions and simular cutting knives as the granulator. I’ll post as I build and experiment. Thoughts please?
Good luck to all!

In reply to: Research shredder

08/01/2015 at 12:28
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To anyone reading this, and to Dave, I wanted to say thanks for sharing these thoughts for would-be mechanical engineers like myself. I am dying to go to school for it and wouldn’t mind trying to build a machine if blueprints come up.

All I ask is people keep in mind the soft malleable plastic that water/soda bottles use, were big on recycling in my household and love to collect bottles to sell, and if I can chip the bottles it would increase a ton of space and density for higher return/less wasted trips.

Good luck everyone.

In reply to: Research shredder

19/01/2015 at 07:58
0

Hi guys,

I think muscle power can do the job of shredding plastics.
A design using bicycle parts

The important element here is the sharp blades.

What do you think?

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