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Precious Plastic meets Precious Coffee

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Olivier 3 years ago.

1
Tomás tomas-ppptv

Precious Plastic meets Precious Coffee

11/11/2017 at 16:24

Applying the same “modus operandi” as Precious Plastic in order to repurpose tons of wasted coffee grounds.
– OPEN SOURCE;
– Machines made from basic materials, affordable & easy to build;
– Modular and scalable;
– Fun 😊

Building a set of machines which make the extraction of biofuel, from used coffee grounds, possible.
Residual waste can then be turned into coffee briquettes/pellets which can be used for heating or cooking purposes.
Used coffee grounds could possibly provide energy to power a Precious Plastic V3.0 container/workshop.

Let’s apply the lessons learned and repurpose used coffee grounds so they don’t end in a landfill.

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helper
11/11/2017 at 21:26
3

Hmm interesting i am going to look into this

new
11/11/2017 at 21:42
4

Thanks man!

Please check bio-bean.
It’s a company based in London. Unfortunately their technics are not open sourced I’m afraid. However, it’s a really good starting point.

Tomás

starter
12/11/2017 at 01:32
1

Ooh, I like this. I’m guessing you are targeting coffee shops rather than individual consumers?

Most of my hippy pals who have coffee grinds to dispose of put them in the compost/ wormeries, and one dedicated gem of a person keeps his for his orchard as they are acidic and especially good for fruit trees apparently. (Who knew?).

dedicated
12/11/2017 at 03:40
1

Super keen for the bio bean I live in melbourne the cafe capital of Australia. Love the idea

new
12/11/2017 at 15:15
3

Great!

Yes, bio-bean is a company on an industrial level for big cities like Melbourne [and London] 😊

Precious Coffee could be implemented in big villages or small cities. Using coffee from the biggest coffee shops and office spaces. Not really on a household level.
The biofuel part of the process may be complex, but the briquettes/pellets part not so much, I think.

new
12/11/2017 at 15:19
1

Nice 😊 Yes, (big) coffee shops, office towers and train stations for instance.

Great idea too! They also work great when cultivating mushrooms.

hero
17/11/2017 at 21:23
2

That’s cool
I know that you can mix egg shells and coffee grinds to make an excellent fertilizer, but one project I have been interested for a while is to use food leftovers to create Methane gas using a home-made biodigester
Biodigestor casero de bidón

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