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Washing Plastic (V4)

This topic contains 8 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Paul 1 week ago.

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Louis Bindernagel brunowindt

Washing Plastic (V4)

02/12/2018 at 18:10

Washing plastic is essential in the recycling process and at the moment it is mostly done by hand – a very time-consuming process.

While working with plastic films I came in contact with water and plastic and the advantages but also dangers it has to offer. Shredding film has turned out to be a challenge because of overheating and dust. My only solution for this was to work with a water-cooling system. I got familiar with the dangers of microplastic in water, the dirt and chemicals, and filtration processes. I changed my focus and now I am working on everything which has to do with washing. Starting before shredding and ending with a clean and dry workable material.

Washing plastic is a very broad topic and it contains many different steps. Each of them is important and I will spend the next months on researching, experimenting and updating you guys – I hope, together with your help, we can create a way to make it possible, that small workshops are able to work efficiently and save for the environment.

Creating clean plastic demands different machines, which have to function in a workflow. Designing this process seems to me as important as designing the machines so I will also work a lot on how the different work steps could look like.

So what have I done so far:
After gathering all the information from @mathijsstroobers topic washing plastic and some research I have defined and started to work on the different steps – Cutting and prewashing, shredding with water, collecting the shreds in a mesh bag, modifying a washing machine, drying and most important filtering.

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

starter
02/12/2018 at 18:12
2

Cutting and prewashing:
I haven’t done any experiments here yet, but I believe for some sort of products it might be helpful to clean them a little bit before shredding, e.g. oily surfaces or impurities like sand which would be to rough on the shredder. Though the end goal is to make this step obsolete.

Shredding with water:
This is a fairly easy process, as long as your shredder is built from stainless steel or made water-resistant in any other way. I connect a pump (link here) to a water tank, located beneath the shredder from there a pipe leads up to the shredder and the water cools, contains the dust and ends up in the tank again. Of course, you need some sort of sieve or mesh to keep the plastic shreds out of the pump. In my first system I used a fine mesh on the bottom, this way turned out to be prone to failure and clogged up easily.

In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

helper
06/12/2018 at 14:07
1

Experiment | Using a paint mixer to clean shredded plastic

This morning I experimented with using a multi-purpose mixer to clean shredded plastic in a bucket of water.

The mixer creates a lot of turbulence, which seems like it could be pretty effective for cleaning plastic. The mixer’s turbulence seems like it’d be a good counterpart to the centrifugal force created by the washing machine, which is better for forcing particulate/water out once it’s already been agitated.

Switching back and forth between rotation directions seems to be a good way to continually agitate the plastic. You could potentially have 2 or 3 mixers installed into a single, large container, rotating in opposite directions to really stir things up.

Louis and I discussed the possibility of a two-phase process earlier and it seems like the mixer and washing machine might be a good combination for such a process.

Phase 01: Use turbulence of the mixer to agitate and aggressively clean/separate particulate from plastic.

Phase 02: Use centrifugal force of the washer to force remaining particulate and water out of the mix through a mesh.

More experimenting to do, of course, but interested in exploring this route – In this scenario, it might even be possible to simplify the washer down to a rotating drum that’s rigged up to some sort of motor/bicycle.

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

helper
06/12/2018 at 13:26
1

Below are some images of the results. The plastic was partially cleaned, but some residue remained on many of the pieces.

Conclusion: Leaving the pieces in their original form seems to be less effective than shredding (at least when contained in the mesh bag) since it makes it more difficult for the water to reach every surface. Smaller pieces got trapped in larger containers which also caused complications.

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

helper
06/12/2018 at 13:24
1

I’ve been exploring uses and solutions for non-recyclable plastic over the past couple of months for V4 (see more here)
A lot of the plastic I’ve encountered hasn’t truly been “non-recyclable”… we just don’t have an efficient way to clean it properly right now, so it ends up being discarded rather than recycled. I’m teaming up with Louis to develop a cleaning method to take care of this problem.
Experiment | Cleaning unshredded plastic waste with washing machine
To start off, I experimented by collecting dirty (moldy), household plastic waste to see how well it’d be cleaned in the washing machine without shredding beforehand.

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

starter
02/12/2018 at 18:41
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Modifying a washing machine:
A household laundry washing machine provides me with many features I can take advantage of. I can use the different programs, temperatures and especially the centrifugation function, which will help a lot to get the plastic dry after its clean. All whats then still necessary is to hang up the bag for a little bit and the plastic is ready to use. Connected to a water pump and tanks the machine manages to run autonomous and I can contain the dirt and microplastic in a filter, before adding the greywater to the sewage or even water plants. To save energy and reduce material damage the pump is controlled by a relay which turns on when the inlet valve of the washing machine opens up. How effective this process is gonna be I still have to find out in the next weeks with many experiments and ways to proof the cleanliness of the plastic.

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starter
02/12/2018 at 18:32
1

Collecting shreds in a mesh bag:

For the next system, I am trying bags made out of mesh. They will be connected directly to the shredder, collect the plastic, but let out the water and the dirt. For these bags, I am trying differently sized mashes to see what works the best for what kind of plastics and shredders. Changing to bags can help to keep a necessary cleanliness, they are used from shredding to washing to drying and also for storing.
A color system could help to keep the individual bags dedicated to one certain kind of plastics.

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

starter
02/12/2018 at 18:45
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Each topic is covered only very vague and I will post more detailed later about them, but right now I am testing, researching and could really use some input about your experiences with cleaning plastic, filtering water, drying and everything around. One problem for me at this point is to find good methods to control how well I am able to clean the plastic and the water. To see the results in plastics I will start with one very simple method. In a small mold, I press and the test sample in a sheet of roughly 1 mm thickness and control it over a light table for seeable contaminations, how I can find oils and other alien materials is still a mysterium for me. A similar process can be used for the water.
If you have tips, questions, critics please answer in the topic and I will get back to you!

Louis

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In reply to: Washing Plastic (V4)

starter
02/12/2018 at 18:43
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Filtering:
This is probably the most challenging, but also most exciting problem. The plastic we wash is very contaminated with dirt and oil and also loses microplastics in the process. All of this will end up in the water. Many low-key washing facilities around the world are pouring this toxic mixture on the streets or in the sewage, a proper filtering system can be very complex and expensive. I am going to gather information about ways to filter different contaminations, recreate them in a DIY environment find out what works and at the end provide instructions for an easily repeatable filter, so workshops can deal with their own waste.
The first two prototypes are connected between the pump and the dirt-water, this is not an ideal solution but I am trying to work now with one “clean” tank and one dirty one. Perhaps I will introduce an overflow filter between those two.
The filter medium I chose is polyester filling. In my test, I got very good filtering results and the medium can be used for a long time (so far). After it is unusable, we can dry it and for example, put it in a pyrolysis machine or bring it compactly stored to a recycling facility. Attached to the recent filter is a box with activated charcoal to reduce the toxins in the water, this is a very well tested way and I only need to figure out how often I should be using it to get out the most of the activated charcoal.

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