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helper
21/10/2019 at 03:19
0

The roof of my car ports “aka workshop that keeps wifes car in the rain” is corrugated iron with steel beams underneath holding them on.
I could run a frame on top of the roofing sheets to put the brackets/panels on or I could also add a few more beams under the roofing sheets to get the right distances and then use a bracket on top of the roofing sheet screwed down through it to the beam below.

One reason I love the idea of using plastic brackets (especially recycled plastic) is the fact that with an iron roof and aluminium solar panels any contact between the two would over time cause dissimilar metals corrosion.

I had only been considering the clamp style in the past as that is what I had seen done/offered by commercial installers, I will have to go and have a look at the panels now to see if it could be as simple as bolting straight onto the panel with a plastic spacer to keep it off the roof 🙂

helper
18/10/2019 at 15:12
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Hi @samsmith, love what you are doing with the flakes to print as well as well basically everything else I seem to hear you are doing like the metabolizer.

I am not here to stroke your ego though today (although everyone does deserve a pat on the back when it is due so I whole heartedly mean the initial comment.

What I am wondering is whether you saved/kept the design for the solar brackets you printed to mount panels onto your bus.
I ask because I currently have around 30 panels sitting around not producing me power yet with no way to mount them and a pile of HDPE staring at me begging to be shredded and put to use, but also about a million other bits of machinery i need to get started on as well.
Even just a picture (although i wouldn’t say no to the actual cad files either) might be enough to tip the balance for me to hurry up and get on with making a 3d printer over some other task 🙂

helper
11/10/2019 at 07:51
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Please don’t take this message as a “don’t bother” type post as I truly believe their is a huge market awaiting a discovered use that we can commonly replicate as “little guys” in recycling, however my unintentional demoralising speach starts now:

While i’m hoping more viable solutions appear, unfortunately insulated cable plastic is hard to deal with.
In part this has to do with the fact that depending on each cables properties (for example UV resistance) many unknown additives may have been used which at best might cause small issues with processing or at worst react with each other.
On top of this a lot of the cables are made from Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) which currently seems very hard for “smaller scale (meaning pretty much anything but a factory dedicated to handling PVC melt/extrusion)” recycling thanks to the fact it can give off gasses like chlorine when you try and melt it.
Adding on to this, while most of your cable insulation could be PVC, it isn’t the only type of insulation used meaning you could have a ton of PVC mixed with random amounts of Polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP), Polyurethane (PUR), Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE), Nylon and probably some others I haven’t given thought to.

With all that said though I would love for people to jump on and reply with some new breakthrough as I do believe their is a huge potential for salvage yards etc. with mindsets like yours to be able to save on waste fees and increase profit all while feeling good “doing the right thing”.

helper
20/09/2019 at 03:59
1

Wow what a great portable little setup, it certainly looks like it hasn’t stopped you from putting out some good quality pieces either.

In reply to: Plastic washing/drying

helper
19/09/2019 at 09:50
1

Just throwing out their an idea floating around in my head (i’m currently keeping an eye out for another free washing machine to turn up at the local tip), has anyone considered/tried attaching a few blades for example lawn mower blades to the center of the tub to both help create extra turbulence and to a lesser degree cut larger items (like milk bottles) to allow for better pre shred cleaning.

The aim wouldn’t be to shred in the machine, just to cut larger things open to allow the insides to be cleaned better without needing to manually cut each bottle.

In my mind I am thinking maybe 6 blades, two evenly spaced off to one side, at 90 degrees to that a single blade centred and angled opposite and then repeat 2 blades then one each 90 degrees.

Might be a terrible idea, might be a winner but I figured until I can get hold of a machine to test with it isn’t fair keeping it locked in my head.

Added an image for the visual thinkers.

Attachments:
helper
15/09/2019 at 22:24
2

Haven’t done any “pinging” etc. to see who you might be hosting the site with, although if you are paying $$$$ to host it I would be happy to set you up an account on my webmin server which is in a Brisbane datacentre at no cost (unless you start costing me a fortune in bandwidth) 🙂

Feel free to reach out either here or via discord (i’m Cartlin Recycling) if you want any info on what the server is running (eg. php versions available, MariaDB etc.).

helper
12/01/2019 at 14:27
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Whilst not entirely plastic specific as I originate from recycling metals, however, some of the forging I do uses a small amount of LPG to start and then runs on primarily used cooking oil, this can also be used for heating entire houses although it does not drop low enough where I am for me to use this. If you are able to regulate temperature well enough it could possibly used for heating an oven in an offgird environment or simply as house heating reducing the off grid power need for that.
If you have local shops that use cooking oil, often you will find they are more than happy for you to take their waste oil for free as it means they do not have to try and get rid of it.
As I move towards recycling more and more different types of materials, I will be installing solar panels as I can afford to reduce the cost of my recycling both monetary as well as through not drawing from the coal based grid power.

helper
30/12/2018 at 14:44
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On your first point of water, I have heard of several people filtering the waste water and then reusing it again for the next wash which not only prevents anything going into the local ecosystem but also reduces the required water.
The down side is potentially the cost for any filtering in different parts of the world, as I am not yet doing this myself I can’t really offer any further suggestion than that.

On the second point of everything else you can pickup it will depend in part as to what is available to you business wise in your local area.
I currently pickup “all” recyclables yet I only process a fraction of them myself until they in turn pay for more machinery.
What I do is process any metals which I then get paid for at a local scrap yard, their is a local “change for your beverage containers” scheme so all glass, aluminium and plastic beverage bottles goes to this scheme (I remove the lids to recycle myself), plastics that are left that I can process are sorted and used and pretty much anything that is left (paper, cardboard, glass) I can take to a local waste transfer station and place in their recycling area.
Unfortunately in Australia Glass has virtually no value (-$35 to $0 a ton) most of the time, although you could see if their are any glass recyclers in your area that would either buy or pickup for free any of that (can look for recyclers for paper and cardboard as well).

Not a lot of help i’m afraid but maybe something of use for you to consider 🙂

helper
18/12/2018 at 02:22
2

I like the replaceable teeth idea, one thing I’m not sure if you have considered yet or not, would be creating a tooth design compatible with a current commercially available industrial shredder so that we may either create the teeth ourselves or purchase the OEM teeth ready to go.

I dare say no premade teeth would be particularly cheap, although they would be made to handle industrial loads AND in some countries if fabrication availability is an issue, sourcing a commercial product might not be.

helper
03/02/2018 at 04:49
1

I am in Mount Glorious, over the next few weeks I will probably be reaching out to someone who can make shredder blades etc. depending on what eWaste scrap I manage to get hold of (meaning how much of the rest of a build I can make myself at no/little cost).

Feel free to reach out via PM if you wanted to bounce ideas of someone as well as letting me know where you are at with equipment and I would be more than happy to try and help however I can (be that through helping with design, helping find builders with the right tools or possibly even by getting prices lower by a group of us purchasing things like shredder blades etc. together at the same time.

helper
03/02/2018 at 04:30
2

I have been finding a lot written about ABS although i’m very keen to confirm that the flame resistant eg. ABS-FR and PC-ABS-FR are able to be recycled in the same method as standard ABS without the risk of me creating more toxic fumes than the problem i’m trying to solve 🙂

The metal scrappers I know would love to have a way of getting rid of their ABS-FR and PC-ABS-FR plastic although currently nobody around will touch it unless you have 20 ton of it….. my plan is to hopefully start processing this to reduce landfill greatly although I would prefer to know it is possible to achieve as a little guy safely before I get started rather than after my doctor tells me the bad news.

Anyone have any solid info on the FR variants and whether I can process it the same as the standard ABS?

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