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helper
05/09/2019 at 11:28
0

Remember to support Breadtags For Wheelchairs.
If there is not a collection bin in your neighbourhood, set one up and contact them to put it on their map. Most Pathcare branches act as collection points, and funnel the collected tags to the logistics partners, who get the tags to Joburg for recycling.
There are now also chapters in Australia and New Zealand.
http://www.breadtagsforwheelchairs.co.za/

helper
05/09/2019 at 11:13
0

Hi, Folks
The first part of the Version 4 business plan system has been released:
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/business-calculator-feedback-needed/
Regards
F.

In reply to: Melting Fishing Line

helper
04/09/2019 at 18:01
1

Hello
I just happened to find this, for what it’s worth.
https://www.cbn.co.za/featured/fishing-line-bin-project-gets-new-pipe-sponsor/

In reply to: Melting Fishing Line

helper
23/08/2019 at 23:30
0

Hi
I think the frequency of fishing boat (“skuite”) use in the area, is probably the key factor.
Strand only has two boat launches (only one of which is really functional) and no jetty. Most of our angling is done from the shore. Also, the high tide covers most of the beach.The ocean currents might also be prone to wash small floating debris away rather than deposit it.
With the notable exception of whale carcasses 🙂 Man, that was a spectacle.
Cheers
F.

In reply to: Melting Fishing Line

helper
23/08/2019 at 01:53
0

I don’t recall ever finding fishing line on the beach. But I’m in one of the windiest parts of the peninsula, so it could be that it’s quickly buried by the wind. (Especially since it’s mostly a night-time activity, putting hours between the discarding and anyone finding the lines on the beach.)
If you really need help with this, I suggest you keep lots of samples on hand. Then you can hand it out to PP people at meetings, so that they have some samples to experiment with in their workspaces, later on.
On a larger scale, environmental NGOs should probably look at efforts to ban the local use of non-biodegradable fishing lines.
Cheers.
PS. Sorry for the staggered response. Not my fault. It’s a bug in the forum, that happens when you edit typos.

In reply to: Melting Fishing Line

helper
23/08/2019 at 01:50
0

Even in SA, it might be somewhat of a regional problem.

Where I am, the municipality employs beach cleaners to keep the beach in a condition that draws the tourists that local businesses rely on. So, we don’t get our hands on many samples of beach plastic.
In the busy season, I might find a discarded bottle here and there.
Fishing line will also be more common in places where more of the locals make a living from fishing.

In reply to: Melting Fishing Line

helper
23/08/2019 at 01:44
0

Hello
I’ve gotten some feedback from @pauldufour.
It seems they have mostly dealt with discarded nets and not fishing line. (Different fishing methods from around the World.)

helper
23/08/2019 at 01:43
2

http://wwmp.org.za/elitsha/2019/06/28/wastepickers-tell-of-poor-conditions/
This is a project from @makerstationhq.
I think we should have city-wide meet-ups there.
These trolleys might also work as static collection bins to be parked in certain regular spots for trash donation from the public.
The idea is that businesses can sponsor a trolley in exchange for an advertisement on the trolley. They are also fitted with flashing LED “hazard” lights and GPS trackers.

helper
19/08/2019 at 18:26
1

Hello @thebeachcombers
Since I live at the beach in False Bay, fishing is something I often watch being done, but have not done myself. (And I pretend not to freak out, when sharks are pulled out from the surf where everybody swims.)
Subsequently, I can’t tell you much about fishing line. But it’s the Information Age, so:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_line
It seems fishing line can be made from several different materials (including natural fibres), so you would have to first determine the melting point of each of them. And blends will probably be tricky.
There’s a PP beach plastic research team, based in the Maldives: https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/ocean-plastic-research/
Maybe see if they have advice on fishing line?
My guess is the best plan is to just try to upcycle the fishing line, and not try to reprocess it. That’s all I can think of, right now.
Cheers
F.
Update:
The discussion will continue here:
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/melting-fishing-line/

helper
05/08/2019 at 12:54
1

Hello, folks
I’m continuously finding potential training and outreach opportunities in and around Cape Town, for people willing to put in the time and effort.
I just don’t want to make premature announcements of my plans.
So, there is slow progress being made. Just stay tuned. And tell the community about any initiatives that you have up and running.
I’m generally not a big fan of government and corporate sponsorship, since such initiatives tend to start out strong, and then fizzle out quickly when the political and public relations value starts to wane.
But there are a few subsidy options I’m looking at in terms of training people, since having professional machine builders alone is clearly not translating into functional workspaces / maker spaces.
Also, the original point was to tackle plastic pollution and waste.
Remember that “minor issue”?
Based on my latest discoveries, a city-wide meet-up for Cape Town is now feasible.
As we know, the layout of the city sucks, and getting from one side of the city to the other, can be a nightmare for most of us.
But I’ll find the best possible solution.
Like I said… stay tuned.

Regards
F.

helper
05/08/2019 at 12:17
0

Hello

Keep an eye on these:
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/south-africa-general-discussion-and-info/
https://map.preciousplastic.com/
If you’re not on the map, potential collaborators can’t find you.

Cheers

helper
25/06/2019 at 22:29
1

@georgegee I’ll try to get over my Facebook phobia, but I can’t promise anything. 🙂

helper
25/06/2019 at 20:31
1

Thanks for the tips, @timslab, and thanks for representing SA in Eindhoven.
I’ve arranged a meeting with Lional. We’ll discuss some ideas.

Every country is different. Even what seem like minor cultural, political, economic or environmental differences can make a huge difference to the locals.
For example, Cape Town has a water crisis, due to severe drought. Until this is solved, washing large quantities of plastic for processing is a huge problem.
It’s important to keep in mind that what works well in one place, might work less well, or not at all, in another place.
While international help is great and sometimes necessary, I’m a fan of local self-sufficiency. Without getting too much into the politics of the matter, I would say that local self-sufficiency is exactly what’s needed to combat the globalization models that keep turning parts of the World into international garbage dumps. But to learn how to use what we have, we first have to figure out what we have. That part alone, can be tricky. It takes time and effort.
So…think global, act local…and stay tuned.

helper
21/06/2019 at 22:42
1

Thanks @raeford
Prices are a problem. No doubt about it.
It’s one of the things we need to solve, collectively.
I’m still fact finding on this.
Stay tuned.

helper
18/06/2019 at 18:49
1

@donald
“willing/stupid”
LOL 🙂

helper
18/06/2019 at 16:35
2

There is at least one manufacturing process where pool noodles are extruded. So, I’m curious about what’s happening inside the machine.
If you can make one shape, you can make many. LDPE foam is also extruded in a “net” configuration that is used to package individual large fruits like mangos (see the photo below).

The hardest thing to find at reasonable cost, is foam hand grips. I buy children’s skipping ropes at a toy store and take off the grips. I keep the rope just for rope. The plastic handles are left as “waste” that needs to go for recycling.
But I can only collect so much rope, before it’s ridiculous. I’ll keep looking for a practical solution.
So, I think there is hope for the concept of DIY impact foam. It’s something for developers to look at.

There’s also this trick to try:
Heat welding polyethylene foam (with a heat gun) https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Asc2w3o6fdE
It might just be very tricky with tiny pieces and I don’t know how to identify the difference between PU and PE foam. I guess you just test it, and see if it melts or burns. PU is apparently very heat-sensitive and basically just dissolves like cotton candy.

Attachments:
helper
16/06/2019 at 18:04
2

Thanks, @donald
Here are some basic demos that explain the concept:
Rigid Foam molding
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RQbfGSttIFU
Factory production process
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HQw9s4Yfvdo
Soft polyurethane tutorial
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_O_vd_I_ojI

Yes, the standard method of production is clearly a chemical reaction. I thought it might be a mechanical process (like injecting air into a vat of liquid, or something like that.)
But one of my pool noodles says it’s LDPE (Type 4). So, same chemical process? I wonder.

Anyway, finding a cost-effective alternative to off-the-shelf products seems unlikely. For small-scale production, at least. Unless someone can come up with an entirely different alternative material with the same basic, physical properties.

The multi-coloured or “speckled” sheets made from joined waste pieces (seen in the video previously posted) is called “chip-foam.” It’s quite stiff and would typically be used as the bottom layer of a crash mat or core layer of a gymnastics mat. I find falling on it, even from standing height, still hurts quite a bit. The type of floor under it might make a difference. Hard wood and concrete will hurt. I’ll try to find out how they are joined. The surface is quite brittle and one can break little pieces off of it with one’s fingers.

There is a spray-can adhesive that sticks PU foam pieces together. That might be a way to salvage off-cuts.

helper
13/06/2019 at 19:11
1

Hi @websterx
I’m having ongoing discussions with some people outside of the forums.
Some are signed up here. Others are not.
At this “early” stage it’s about finding common interests and assessing what everyone can and can’t bring to the table. This is a diverse community and everyone has their own goals.
That’s fine.
I’ll post here when I have something useful to report that multiple people can benefit from. No point in wasting people’s time with vague ideas and nothing to show.
Also, the Version 4 improvements will be able to help beginners a lot.
I’m also an absolute beginner with a huge learning curve ahead of me.
Regards
F.

helper
13/06/2019 at 16:49
0

Also, I missed this topic before:
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/3d-printer-filament-maker-prototype/
There seems to be an improvement coming in Version 4 (or later).

helper
13/06/2019 at 16:40
0

Also, I missed this topic before:
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/3d-printer-filament-maker-prototype/
There seems to be an improvement coming in Version 4.

helper
13/06/2019 at 14:54
1

Once the page source is open you can also do a “Find in page” text search for: <div id=”post-
Most browsers probably have this feature as well.
“Worst case scenario”: Copy-and-paste the whole source to a text editor and do the search with it instead.

helper
13/06/2019 at 11:53
0

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BU3wotsB9vc
An advertised open source filament extruder from Plastic Bank.

helper
13/06/2019 at 10:59
1

Thanks @donald
I’ll give it a try.
A “quote” and “copy link” button is on my list of feature requests for One Army. 🙂

helper
13/06/2019 at 09:38
3

Hello
Below is a clip that says Plastic Bank has an open source filament extruder. Might be worth looking into for the technical folks here.
I’m definitely interested, but my own project is still in too early a stage. I’m trying to connect with local engineering people to help me out.

helper
11/06/2019 at 10:27
1

Thanks @donald
I haven’t even begun researching the materials yet. I’ll look into it. But I’m not a “techy”.  I’m mostly here to just watch, learn and copy.
The foam I’m talking about is open-cell foam. Soft, spongy, squishy material that acts as a shock-absorber.
It might be a completely different material and manufacturing process.
I buy sheets of the stuff from a local mattress factory. It helps to combine different densities in layers. That’s what makes a good gymnastics mat or mattress. It affects the “impact profile” of the foam to reduce how much the impact hurts you.

helper
11/06/2019 at 09:44
3

Hello.
It would be great if the developers could look into methods of making different sizes of foam padding. It is very useful for making DIY sports equipment. Particularly for gymnastics and martial arts, where all kinds of padding is needed to avoid injury in training. I find commercial products are quite expensive for people who want to set up home gyms. Usually only professional clubs can afford it. I have no idea how difficult it would be to do. Just something to think about.

EDIT:
I’ve found out that the standard method of production is a chemical reaction. I thought it might be a mechanical process (like injecting air into a vat of liquid, or something like that.)
Finding a cost-effective alternative to off-the-shelf products seems unlikely. For small-scale production, at least.Unless someone can invent an entirely different alternative material with the same basic, physical properties.

Viewing 30 replies - 1 through 30 (of 37 total)