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warrior
19/09/2019 at 14:02
2

more photos

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warrior
19/09/2019 at 14:01
2

Hey y’all !
I totally agree with @sneyk 😀 that’s exactly the same process we have hehe
i just took some photos of some of our PS products, and when transparent PS is used, we see the “air?” bubbles you talk about, but the surface is smooth for us. You should really be sure to be excessive amount of plastic (and have an exit point for that excess) in order for the mould to be totally filled up 🙂
Cheers !

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warrior
10/09/2019 at 13:59
0

Salut les Frenchies 🙂
Si jamais ca peut vous aider, il y a 2 plateformes discord dédiées à precious plastic;

l’officiel international  :

https://discord.gg/6Jgr7nq

Et celui pour les francophones :
https://discord.gg/Qa3wTrn
(vous y trouverez des wiki relatifs au plastique, à la fabrication du broyeur, du système à compression et surement des collègues proches de chez vous pour monter un projet PP !)

A bientôt !
Nico

In reply to: Bonjour, I am french

warrior
28/08/2019 at 15:22
0

Bienvenue !

warrior
25/07/2019 at 09:43
2

Hello everyone,

Here is a little update to explain to you guys a new technique we discovered.

The output product is hollow tube made out of LDPE pallet wrap.

 

Needed material :
– 1 plancha
– heat protection gloves
– LDPE Pallet wrap (seperated into thin layers)
– a cylindric metal bar (cut it so that it’s length is smaller than the plancha length)
– 1 heatgun (optionnal)

Process :
– Put plancha to heat (not maximum temperature as it will more likely degrade the LDPE)
– Add 1 layer of LDPE ( try cutting the LDPE so it fits the plancha’s inner dimensions)
– once 1rst layer is melted, use gloves to reagglomerate into a little ball and put it aside on the plancha
– put a 2nd layer and repeat reagglomeration, adding it with the 1rst layer
– put a 3rd layer and repeat reagglomeration, adding it with the 1rst  & 2nd layers.
– put the “ball” in the middle of the plancha and start rolling it with your hands in order for the “ball” to gain more and more length.
– Once you have a “more or less” cylinder, reposition it in the middle of the plancha.

– Use the metal cylindric bar to flatten (the more you can) the molten plastic as if it was a rolling pin
– As you will continue rolling the metal bar; it’s temperature will rise and the molten plastic will start to stick to the bar.
– You want to continue that process until all the molten plastic is around the metal bar. If there are gaps to be filled, you can always add a bit of LDPE to melt and fill thesaid gaps with the same rolling technique.

Unmoulding.
the step is quite an issue, because LDPE warps around the metal bar when colling down. There are 2 straightforward possibilites to unmould the hollow tube.

– The easiest way is to cut a straight line through the hollow tube and “open” it up slightly so it detaches itself from the bar. This then requires to use a heatgun to refuse the tube.
– Another way to do it (only works if the metal tube you used is hollow too) is to use the heatgun, and make the heat go through the metal hollow bar. This will heat up the plastic which is in contact with the metal bar. You then only need a lot of strength to pull it out. Careful though, if you heat it too much, it’s not only the ID of the plastic hollow tube which will melt but ALL the plastic tube, meaning you won’t be able to pulling without wrecking everything :p

i hope you can guess what was our process for the last photo 🙂

 

Cheers !

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In reply to: Decolorizing plastics

warrior
24/07/2019 at 07:28
0

Hello Paul !
(since you asked me in MP too, i’ll just copy my answer here so it can benefit everyone)

I don’t think there is any way to decolorize plastics. The color of a plastic is due to the pigmentation additives it has in it.

I work it out the other way round; as i color ”transparent” plastic through addition of colored plastics (of same type obviously). The pigments therefor blend in all the mass of molten plastic giving it the color !

That is one of the main issues of recycling industries, mixing all the colours will always give you a ”grey”-ish colour. Most of recycled products (PET bottles being an exception here) you will find are grey due to that point

Hope it helps you a bit ! Cheers Nick

warrior
23/07/2019 at 07:24
0

Hello Fabien!
Welcome on the international PP Forum 🙂
Are you starting with all 4 machines or maybe are you thinking of building and using them 1 at a time ? (or schredder + 1 ?)
If you want any help with national stuff, i setup i discord platform for the french community 🙂
Here is the link : https://discord.gg/TfXKRe6
Good luck with that interesting project ! 😀
Nico

warrior
01/07/2019 at 10:25
5

heya 😀

i managed to do that in a multiple step process !

Print object in PLA.

Make a little wooden box, hollow in the top.

Put 3D printed (PLA) product in wooden box.

Fill the box with a thermoset resin (so heat doesn’t impact the moulding process); i am sorry i can’t recall which resin was used, but it can be found “more or less” easily in specific shops. You also want to make sure the resin you chose is flexible.

 

Once the resin is dried; take out the PLA product of the resin mould, and put back the mould inside it’s wooden casing.

 

Tadaaa your compression mould is ready for use (just be careful to reinforce the wooden casing to be sure it handle the pressure applied to the moulding process!)
i posted a couple pictures on our instagram page https://www.instagram.com/preciousplastic_sartrouville/

hope it helps !
cheers !

warrior
21/06/2019 at 08:06
2

i really have to insist on the SLOWNESS of the degradation process.

 

We baught approx 200 larvas; they are living through their 5th or 6th cycle now; and are still eating the same expanded polystyrene we put almost 7 months ago.

VERY VERY SLOW process ! (but interesting nonetheless :p)

warrior
20/06/2019 at 12:44
3

sorry for bad photo quality 🙁

happy tenebrions doing there thing 😀

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warrior
20/06/2019 at 08:08
5

hello @edwardmartinhill,

PET is very sensitive to 2 types of degradation :

– Hydrodegradation is caused by presence of humidity or water (H20) while trying to melt. The H2O breaks the PET bonds to form other chemical bonds.

-thermodegradation is caused by being at too high T° or too long at high T° (while already being melted)

I don’t think you have encountered any of these degradations though…
Another point to keep in mind is that PET is highly thermoresistant, meaning if the thickness of the PET you are trying to melt is too big (too many layers of schredded plastic?) it will form a sort of shell and won’t let the center part melt properly.

 

Another important point i observed was that the material which is in contact with the molten PET while cooling will have total control on the surface’s texture and colour output.

 

this document  : http://www.inrs.fr/publications/bdd/plastiques/polymere.html?refINRS=PLASTIQUES_polymere_15
says  : 90°C-120°C for extrusion-moulding
230°-270°C for extrusion-blowing

i tried to find a chart for you to visualise easier the thermodegradation but can’t get a hold of it :

Here is a very interesting doc on PET recycling, in french though, but if you can google-translate it, should be perfect for you !

https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-00292038/document

Cheers!

In reply to: Recycling bottle caps

warrior
20/06/2019 at 07:48
0

Hey there @ianrobbo !

bottle caps will “always” be PP or PE (which are from same family Polyolefin).
in order to have best quality of product output, i would recommend only using “food-grade” bottle caps, as the types of additives in them should be limited.

concerning the granulated PET/PP mix, from my point of view you won’t be able to do anything with it; PET & PP have highly different chemical stucture and product output will be very brittle (and not rerecyclable)

hope the info helps you out x)

In reply to: Polyolefin

warrior
20/06/2019 at 07:43
1

Hey @btmetz !

Polyolefin is just the category which regroups mainly PE & PP, so it includes LLDPE, LDPE, HDPE & PP

here is from wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyolefin

A <b>polyolefin</b> is a type of polymer produced from a simple olefin (also called an alkene with the general formula CnH2n) as a monomer. For example, polyethylene is the polyolefin produced by polymerizing the olefin ethylene. Polypropylene is another common polyolefin which is made from the olefin propylene.

So my guess is that it’s not a good idea to alloy it with PET..

cheers !

warrior
20/06/2019 at 07:39
2

Hey all;

After my visit last year at Eindhoven (and saw they were experimenting with mealworms & PS foam), i had to give it a try myself !

It seems the larvas can sustain on PS Foam only, but when they evolve to scarabes, they need some sort of complementary food & humidity (i just add some soaked little pieces of bread every few days)

The process is VERY slow, they tend to make some tunnels inside the PS foam rather than eating random pieces of PS.

 

I’ll try posting a pic of degraded PS foam this week !

Cheers

edit : the type of worms i have are tenebrion molitor

warrior
04/06/2019 at 11:15
2

@donald exactly 😀

let me know how your experiments work out 😀
Cheers!

warrior
04/06/2019 at 10:54
2

oh , and concerning the “100% recyclable” written on the bottles, welcome to the green washing 😀
let’s take the example of a PET bottle. Recycling industries have to take care of tons & tons of plastic at a time. So in order to be effective, industries specialize their process for a certain type of flux.

PET bottles is a flux of it’s own. Though on the PET bottle it is written 100% recyclable. The only part that interests thesaid industry is just the PET. The lid isn’t PET, the wrapping (with writings & info) is not PET, the glue or ink is not PET. Though it is said on the bottle that it is 100% recyclable, the specialzed industries who recycle them will never do 100% 🙁

cheers !

warrior
04/06/2019 at 10:48
2

it seems i wasn’t clear enough :p
So.. how is a plastic made ? again & again copy paste (sorry for the ones who read this before)”Plastics… so what is a plastic ? A plastic is : polymer + additives

The polymer can be Polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP) etc.. each polymer has it’s own properties (density, clearness, softness etc…)

Additives on the other hand will give extra properties to the plastic. The types of additives are VERY wide, can be to add uv-resistance, strength, make it easier to inject, cheaper to produce, flame resistant, etc…

Each additive (at least in europe) is more or less regulated into big categories of products, the most strict category being “food grade”; the legislation only permits industries to select additives through their list (1000+ possible additives)

Also, additives always migrate, meaning they get out of the plastics through time, heat, contact.. and each additive has a treshold which should not be exceeded (measurements are based on the usage of the product; single use plastic = 1 time use migration treshold measurement)

Soooo when you are putting one type of plastic to melt; there are different additives which may react to each other, and your long lasting “food grade” recycled plastic product will slowly but surely migrate its different additives to the consumer To limit this effect i would recommend you to have an effective ‘sourcing’; meaning trying a specific product at a time and, if it goes well, put it on a green list; otherwise, red..

(What i wrote is just based on the research of have been doing the past year on the subject, making mistakes, learning from them and searching more & more, which might not be the case of everyone launching PP projects _to answer to the “food-grade” recycled products on the bazar_ ; if any polymer-specialist would mind adding their intel on the subject… )”

PET Bottles contain additives (a recent new member of pp sartrouville used to design PET bottles for a Danone and gave me that info)
Here is the french IRSN data sheet concerning PET
http://www.inrs.fr/dms/plastiques/PolymerePlastiques/PLASTIQUES_polymere_15-6/POLYMERE_PET.pdf

It is VERY rare to find products who have 0 additives, but there are some..
for example some pallet wrap has 0 additive, i actively recommend you to give it a try !

warrior
04/06/2019 at 08:23
1

though PET is the polymer which requires the highest temperature to melt, it’s stil more than feasable with a regular oven (you need around 200°)
The tricky part about experimenting PET is that it can be very frustrating.

Indeed, PET is very sensitive to 2 types of degradations : thermodegradation (when put at too high temp, or too long at high temp) and hydrdegradation (which will occur if there is water/humidity)

Also, keep in mind that additives can have a impact on the recyclability of a plastic product. In such, i would recommend to start experimenting with virgin plastic products.

 

Pallet wrap can be found in virgin LLDPE
here is an example of a virgin PP product : http://www.sachetcristal.fr/sachet-polypropylene-130-x-180-rabat-adhesif.html
and here is an example of a virgin PS Cristal product :http://www.lustiner.com/Articles/1960973/Pipette-graduee-cotonnee-sterile-PS-cristal-vierge-agree-FDA-Vol-10-0-1-ml-Sterilin-/search%5Bpos%5D=740&search%5Btags%5D=14

The aim of that is to “feel” how a polymer reacts to melting/remoulding. It should help you out a lot to figure out later when plastic products are no-go for recycling

please let me know if you have any issues understanding this part 🙂
cheers!

warrior
03/06/2019 at 13:04
2

Hello @sylvain07 !

Here is how a couple other french folks sourced their shredder motor :

“silent” branch schredder seem to have to right motor specs, 1200rpm already reduced to around 70rpm, monophased, and you get to keep the “on/off” and “back/forward” buttons !

Here is an example of thesaid “silent” branch schredder; i emphasize the “silent” because it is how they name the machines which are already reduced.

https://www.leboncoin.fr/jardinage/1625505195.htm/

hope it helps !
Cheers !

warrior
29/05/2019 at 10:48
1

Hello @recyclediland

why not buy it from french builders ? wouldn’t that help out ? (what frenchisland are you on ?)

There is https://bazar.preciousplastic.com/en/nosoyo who could maybe help you out 🙂

Hope it helps,

Cheers !

warrior
29/05/2019 at 10:43
2

hey @donald !

Thanks for your feedback ! i was not aware there were other french initiatives when i created the post, i would have changed the name of the topic to pp-sartrouville which is the name of my workshop, but i can’t cuz name of topic links to the url (?)

Indeed, most of the research and experiments were done without PP machines, i think it is very important to understand how different plastics “work” in order to utilize the PP machines at their best (and optionnally understand how to not brake the machines ie: extrusion machine’s motor being turned on before the plastic in the “temp zone” is not melted :p)

Will try to continue this as a journal to open new techniques and possibilities through plastic recycling !

Cheers !

In reply to: English Discord

warrior
23/05/2019 at 08:16
1

i can only reach out with my personal experience 😀
I created a discord platform for the french community(20-30regular people, and overall 200+french people joined) a bit more than a year ago; the aim of it being mainly to help people group up, translation work, grouped orders (for laser kit) and local shares of experience

The platform the guys from the V4 is working on will implement a lot of “social” features. The french discord platform will shut down as soon as the said platform is on live 😀

cheers !

warrior
22/05/2019 at 13:10
4

can we please talk about the additives on the concern of mixing plastics together?

please keep in mind that the word “plastic” means : polymer + additives.

Please do more research on that subject because (from my point of vew) i consider that it’s more the different types of additives which (once melted together) create potential problems
LDPE is low density PolyEthylene; HDPE is high density; when you talk about linear vs non linear; linear is another type of PE, LLDPE (linear low density PE)

I am actually working on a video in order to understand easier what a plastic is, and what are the biggest concerns in order to minimize the risks (for recycler & consumer of recycled product)

hope it helped !
cheers!

ps : also, i mainly use LLDPE and HDPE/PP.

LLDPE is used as main mass of treated plastic; the PE &/or PP added (bottle caps) are added in order to “steal” the colour pigments from them and spread it into the molten LLDPE

warrior
17/05/2019 at 16:12
1

i personnally do my compression out of the oven;
process is following :
-turn oven
-put plastic un teflon coated dish and wait for it to melt
– take dish out of oven
– put molten plastic in mould
– compress
-release

/!\ unmoulding is VERY easy and requires no additive
/!\ a lot of time & energy gained, because if compression is in oven, then in order to unmould you need to wait for the oven to cool down etc… and turn back on for next product.
hope it helps !

(i tried butter, virgin coco oil, vaseline, release agent, unmoulding wax… but never felt as easy as the process i just explained)

warrior
17/05/2019 at 15:58
3

Hello @flusteredlondon !

I don’t see why it shouldn’t work out. You may want to be sure all the plastic products are the same polymer; as they will not blend and fuse together through the melting process.

A domestic oven will do the trick, but i would not dare using it to cook food after having processed some plastic with it
Keep in mind to have good ventilation, and max security = gloves, mask & glasses

Looking forward to see that project come to life !
Cheers !
Nick

warrior
16/05/2019 at 14:15
0

@chenkus i guess it’s baking-paper (that’s what i have been using at the beginning of my experiments)

@anris hey ! though the idea of using these as moulds is awesome, i highly recommend you to do some research concerning additives.

<span style=”color: #313131;”>Plastics… so what is a plastic ? A plastic is : polymer + additives</span>The polymer can be Polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP) etc.. each polymer has it’s own properties (density, clearness, softness etc…)

Additives on the other hand will give extra properties to the plastic. The types of additives are VERY wide, can be to add uv-resistance, strength, make it easier to inject, cheaper to produce, flame resistant, etc…

Each additive (at least in europe) is more or less regulated into big categories of products, the most strict category being “food grade”; the legislation only permits industries to select additives through their list (1000+ possible additives)

Also, additives always migrate, meaning they get out of the plastics through time, heat, contact.. and each additive has a treshold which should not be exceeded (measurements are based on the usage of the product; single use plastic = 1 time use migration treshold measurement)

Soooo when you are putting one type of plastic to melt; there are different additives which may react to each other, and your long lasting “food grade” recycled plastic product will slowly but surely migrate its different additives to the consumerTo limit this effect i would recommend you to have an effective ‘sourcing’; meaning trying a specific product at a time and, if it goes well, put it on a green list; otherwise, red..

(What i wrote is just based on the research of have been doing the past year on the subject, making mistakes, learning from them and searching more & more, which might not be the case of everyone launching PP projects _to answer to the “food-grade” recycled products on the bazar_ ; if any polymer-specialist would mind adding their intel on the subject…  )

Here is a very interesting document that @marcvdv sent me concerning additives : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030438941730763X

 

Cheers !

warrior
14/05/2019 at 10:31
7

ohhhhh, that’s just what i’m missing to create geodesic structures 😀 !!! awesome !!!

warrior
14/05/2019 at 07:51
0

check !

warrior
20/04/2019 at 06:56
1

Hello Riccardo !

please do no make food-contact products 🙁
i’ll just copy-paste my statement from this post

Recycled Party Cups!

“Plastics… so what is a plastic ? A plastic is : polymer + additives

The polymer can be Polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP) etc.. each polymer has it’s own properties (density, clearness, softness etc…)

Additives on the other hand will give extra properties to the plastic. The types of additives are VERY wide, can be to add uv-resistance, strength, make it easier to inject, cheaper to produce, flame resistant, etc…

Each additive (at least in europe) is more or less regulated into big categories of products, the most strict category being “food grade”; the legislation only permits industries to select additives through their list (1000+ possible additives)

Also, additives always migrate, meaning they get out of the plastics through time, heat, contact.. and each additive has a treshold which should not be exceeded (measurements are based on the usage of the product; single use plastic = 1 time use migration treshold measurement)

Soooo when you are putting one type of plastic to melt; there are different additives which may react to each other, and your long lasting “food grade” recycled plastic product will slowly but surely migrate its different additives to the consumer To limit this effect i would recommend you to have an effective ‘sourcing’; meaning trying a specific product at a time and, if it goes well, put it on a green list; otherwise, red..

(What i wrote is just based on the research of have been doing the past year on the subject, making mistakes, learning from them and searching more & more, which might not be the case of everyone launching PP projects _to answer to the “food-grade” recycled products on the bazar_ ; if any polymer-specialist would mind adding their intel on the subject… )”

cheers 😀

marble technique is done through LDPE films, oven / compression

warrior
16/04/2019 at 15:33
3

Hello everyone !
Sorry for the long time since i have given you guys an update on what’s going on on our side ^^

So after having experimented manual extrusion we realized that we could explore a bit the couloring side recycling.

The main plastic product we use is pallet wrap, which is LDPE and can be transparent or black. The transparency is due to lack of pigmentation (and thickness being very small), it becomes white once melted (and therefore much more thick as when it was just a sheet)
Understanding that principle we started adding bottle caps to the process. Once all is melted, you can “easily”(need heat-resistant gloves though) mix it with your hands. The more you will mix and the more the colour will be homogeneously blended. The more you add coloured caps (of the same colour), the darker your color will be, the less the brighter. You can also mix colours as you would with paint. I managed to create a nice homogeneous purple mixing red and blue together ! 😀
The first problem you may encouter while trying out that process is that the plastic will stick to your gloves. You should wait a little bit for it too cool down (right before mixing) so that the most exterior layers of the melted plastic is already hardened and therefore not sticky.

 

 

Then lastly with help of Clemence which i met through PP map (thank uuu!) we tried out silicone moulds;
Why silicone ? Isn’t it going to melt ? No ! If you read the PP Manual in the kit, you should know that there are 2 big families of plastics; thermoplastics (which melt at right temperature), and thermosets which can only take shape once. The temperature of melted plastic won’t affect it ! So idea is the following :
Create an item (sculpture, 3Dprint) or just any type of objects :p
Take the impression of it with silicone
Create a casing
Ready to use as a mould !

 

Here is a little rhino we made 😀

Our extrusion machine is almost ready, just need to find someone to help out with the last electrical & electronics parts 🙁

Cheers !

ps : i am sorry for the name of the original post, i didn’t know at that time that other french projects were launched; so it’s PP Sartrouville 😀
u can check us out of FB or insta

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