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starter
31/10/2019 at 13:35
1

@workbenchprojects: awesome, would love to hear some updates on that if you are willing to share.

@suzereuse: I do understand that precious plastic is about giving the plastic waste a new purpose and I think it’s great to produce things from it that the community can either use themselves or sell. But not all of the collected ocean plastic trash will be in the state that it will be reusable to make something new from it. And not all of it is PE or PP…

The idea is not to say “burn everything and make fuel from it” but rather to have a system that goes two ways: what can be used upcycle to new products, go for it. Whatever cannot be upcycled into something reusable, at least make it into something that gets used once again instead of having no use for that sort of trash.

From what I researched, 1kg of plastic leads to 1l of fuel…and you re-use 10% of the fuel to heat the plastic. 90% does not sound too bad of a catch to me. But then I have not tried it myself, yet, so all just theory so far.

By turning plastic waste into fuel, you give the trash a new purpose and you lower the demand of fuel from fresh recourses. The fuel would be produced and used no matter what, so the emissions and energy used (“normal” fuel also takes energy to be produced…does not grow in the gas station ;)) basically stay the same. Or am I seeing this wrong?

starter
28/10/2019 at 17:57
0

Precious plastic machines use a shitload of energy

haha, I just thought exactly the same ;). I was thinking about an off-grid mobile Shredder & Extruder machine where shredder and extruder are turned manually and only the heat is provided by electricity. Even just that is 600W for the heat bands + whatever the inverter and PID controller consumes. Not so mobile anymore if you want to run that on solar :). I guess that’s why I have not seen such a station around, yet (or maybe just did not find it, yet).

starter
28/10/2019 at 17:57
0

Precious plastic machines use a shitload of energy

haha, I just thought exactly the same ;). I was thinking about an off-grid mobile Shredder & Extruder machine where shredder and extruder are turned manually and only the heat is provided by electricity. Even just that is 600W for the heat bands + whatever the inverter and PID controller consumes. Not so mobile anymore if you want to run that on solar :). I guess that’s why I have not seen such a station around, yet (or maybe just did not find it, yet).

starter
17/10/2019 at 12:21
0

I am also interested in this topic, particularily about regulations / laws for selling recycled products (on a small scale) in the US / EU and other countries.

The EU has some regulations for food-contact-materials and if they are recycled it seems there needs to be authorisation for each process https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/chemical_safety/food_contact_materials/authorisations_en But then this is for large companies, I am still searching if there is anything about small-scale production…

If I find anything, I will let you know…

Cheers, Nike

starter
15/10/2019 at 20:06
2

That’s really great, thanks for those modifications!

For the nozzle: do I see that correctly that you welded the square to the tube (around it)? I mean the first tube, that you then bolt the aluminum “nozzle plates” to…

That’s a great modification and saves some money in case you don’t have a lathe and need to have the nozzle machined. Sweet!

Cheers, Nike

starter
15/10/2019 at 16:36
0

So just an idea to change the sheet in case you wanted to see the material production cost as variable towards the number of sales:

Instead of the “material cost” on the “sales” sheet, you have three different columns for each number of working hours collecting, shredding, washing.

And then you change the formuar from for “material cost” in the “Extra” sheet from

=IF((‘1. Sales’!C9*’3. Dashboard’!I8)=0, ,(‘1. Sales’!C9*’3. Dashboard’!I8))

to

=WENN((SUMME(‘1. Sales’!C9:E9)*’3. Dashboard’!$P$3*’3. Dashboard’!I8)=0, ,(SUMME(‘1. Sales’!C9:E9)*’3. Dashboard’!$P$3*’3. Dashboard’!I8))

(this is for the large bowls, just an example ;))

I think that should work…Or did I miss something?

Cheers,
Nike

starter
15/10/2019 at 14:36
0

Hi Flo,

thanks so much for this, that’s a great tool.

I am playing with the calculator a bit and I have some questions that arose:

Q1:
When looking at the costs for each product, there is the position “indirect labour cost” and “material cost”. In your case, the indirect labour cost includes costs for collecting, washing and shredding the plastic.

If all material that is needed for the production is collected, then the field “material cost” would be “0” because you are not purchasing it but the price is defined by the labor that is needed to produce it.

Material cost would only be >0 if you would e.g. purchase some plastic flakes. Is this correct?

Q2:
Somehow I cannot wrap my head around where the 4.33 comes from in the indirect labour cost…

(SUMME(‘2. Costs’!C:C)*4.33*’3. Dashboard’!$P$3*(J47/$J$62)

Q3:
In the Cashflow / Profit and Loss, you listed the working hours that you call “no direct production hours”. If I collect / wash / shred my own material, wouldn’t these work hours also be variable depending on how many products I want to produce?

Let’s say 10 baskets need 1h collecting / 0.5h washing / 0.25 shredding. If I want to double my outcome, I will have to double the work needed for the production of the material and hence would have to include those costs as variable costs in my Cash Flow, no?

I think I would try to separate costs like marketing / maintanance / administration and the production oriented costs like collecting / shredding / washing. That way you could also see how many employes you would need for the different tasks (if you assume that the people collecting are possibly different ones than producing)

For example:
1kg of plastic takes xh of collecting xh of shredding xh of washing
product A needs xkg to be produced, product B needs xkg to be produced
–> that way you could split those production costs over your produced goods like you did with the material cost. Hm, does this make sense?!

I hope you can help me with those questions…:)

Thanks a lot for your awesome work. I look forward to pay something back to the community once we get started.

Cheers, Nike

starter
14/10/2019 at 15:30
0

This is awesome, I was wondering how those baskets were made. Thanks for sharing this information, it helps a lot to understand the process.

Time to build an extruder and start experimenting 🙂

Keep up the great work, Nike

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