Forum Replies Created

Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
sort on most likes
starter
26/07/2019 at 19:04
2

Thanks very much @deeemm for the feedback. We appreciate it so much!!

One of the conclusions drawn from the test is:

– Use normal blades (like double shaft shredder) makes simpler the building process of the SSSS.

Totally agree with you, we think is the best option. As you can see in the photos, the last version has blades without replaceable teeth.

You say that “On your new design, the angle of shear is the angle that the rotating teeth present themselves to the fixed plate – the end of the tooth should touch first.”

That is what really happens. You can see it in the attached photos.

I have also attached a photo that shows the three prototypes of the shredder we have developed so far.

Attachments:
starter
27/06/2019 at 21:34
2

@s2019 the first image is the rotor for the triangular blades. I have changed it for a better one.

starter
26/06/2019 at 20:47
4

The performance with the rectangular blades was very good, shredding around 16kg/h (with a 140mm width shredder, not bad). We did the test without a sieve and the size of the flakes was quite good. However, there were some big flakes of plastic, but it can be solve by installing a sieve.

 

Some conclusions drawn from the test:

– Hard to adjust the gap between blades and static blades with the current design.

– Good size of the flakes with thick plastics.

– Some big flakes with thin plastic (bottles).

– The performance and safety increase with a inclined plate (15 dregrees) for the piston.

– Use normal blades (like double shaft shredder) makes simpler the building process of the SSSS.

– It can shred big pieces of plastic, like sheets or beams.

– It never got stuck during the testings.

– Some pieces of plastic can reach the back of the piston

 

During the tests we measure the current consuption. In some moments, the motor could consume up to 8-10A max, but typically 6A when it is shredding plastic. The nominal current of the electric motor is 6,9A, so the 3kW motor has enough power for the shredder.

Attachments:
starter
26/06/2019 at 17:55
5

It’s been a while we don’t update this topic. We were busy with the development of the V4 Shredder: designing, building, assembling, testing, fixing up, testing again…. So I want to say sorry for that. But it means we have lot of news to tell you about the Single Shaft Shredder development!! We finished and tested the single shaft shredder with triangular blades and rectangular blades.

Triangular blades were hard to manufacture and during the tests some teeth broke because they were not properly welded. Besides, some big pieces of plastic could pass through the rotor (the design has to be improved).

Related with the rectangular blades, they are Hardox 400 made so they were really hard to work with them (drilling, threading). So we decided to weld many of them. The blades that were not welded worked properly.

Attachments:
starter
19/04/2019 at 17:50
4

Hi! My name is Paco, I am from Spain and I am the new member of the shredder team. This month we have been working in some alternatives for the rotor of the single shaft shredder.

 

Option 1

Same design as before, but the rotor has only blades (without spacers)

 

Option 2 

T- blades. This configuration is the most used in industrial shredders. The disk will be manufacture in the lathe and then, the blade support will be weld to the disks.

 

Option 3 

Same as Option 2 but we make the V shape with a milling machine instead of using the lathe. We think this is more efficient but also more difficult to manufacture.

 

We already received the laser cutting parts and now we are assembling both options for the rotor, to test it and choose which one is the best. ​

Attachments:
Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)