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warrior
19/06/2020 at 19:52
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If it is a smooth sphere, for a low cost mold you could try one of these, Carefully cut it in half and encase each half in something strong like mesh reinforced concrete and a steel box.
https://www.banggood.com/search/1050679.html?from=nav
I’m not sure how you avoid bubbles or voids. I think the compression approach would do several flat melt/press/fold cycles and then compress in the mold. Probably depends on how efficient the process needs to be and how many you want to make.

warrior
17/06/2020 at 22:38
1

If you are going to use an injection machine, there is a lot of pressure. Even if you encase the mold in something rigid, I’m not sure you can hold shape or detail.

Also, a 12 cm sphere is about 900 cc. That is a lot for an injection machine.

warrior
12/06/2020 at 03:29
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You might check with the local gardening people. Depending on what the local soil is like, it can be used as a soil additive. We just put ours into our compost bin. I’m sure the worms work faster when they hit the espresso grind.

warrior
08/06/2020 at 21:22
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The PP approach to mounting the TC to the tube may not be the most reliable. Take a look at my suggestion (April 21 post) in this thread and see if it makes sense.
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/injection-machine-help-on-electronics/
Good luck

warrior
08/06/2020 at 19:45
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Just to confirm, When you use the screw type temperature sensors (type K thermocouples) that came with the controller, you have them attached blue to 9 (-) and red to 10 (+). Also your controller model number has a K after the F, indicating it is for type K thermocouples. I can’t tell what your other temperature sensors are but if they are resistor type, they won’t work.

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warrior
08/06/2020 at 02:42
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Interesting, Could you provide the steps. Are you using plaster and a bakeout oven?

warrior
08/06/2020 at 02:29
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Did you buy the temperature sensors with the temperature controllers as a kit? Does the temperature controller part number call out the type of sensor you are using? Take a picture of the sensors, the part number and your connection. Something is not matching up. If you are using thermocouples, are the tips undamaged?

Hopefully, since both are doing it, it should be easier to find the cause.
Good luck

warrior
31/05/2020 at 16:53
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Yeah, I noticed the other day that the only activity was a spam post to a spam topic.
Agreed, there was some good discussion and excitement when this forum was active.

warrior
29/05/2020 at 23:05
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Nice, thanks

warrior
29/05/2020 at 20:57
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Looks great, what force does the cylinder produce?

In reply to: mold active cooling

warrior
03/05/2020 at 03:57
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I believe you. For general purpose, large area compression you need lots of force. The thought was for the relatively small, pyramid shaped mold that a 2 ton jack  might work. 3 broken jacks say otherwise.

In reply to: mold active cooling

warrior
02/05/2020 at 21:19
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Those look really great. I really like your “engineered with what’s cost effective locally” approach to building your machines.
Would a motor (drill?) driven scissor jack work as a replacement for the log splitter?

Thanks for the update.

In reply to: Reuse and Upcycling

warrior
29/04/2020 at 06:12
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I am not personally involved in these efforts so I don’t have any direct information but here are a couple of links to get you started.
https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/3d-printer-for-pet-particles-no-filament-ever/

https://vanplestik.nl/en/about_us/

In reply to: Reuse and Upcycling

warrior
28/04/2020 at 22:03
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Sorry but if you search the forum, there have been several attempts at working with PET. The only successes I remember are the finely shredded PET used in direct 3D printers. The general observation appears to be that PET is both moisture and temperature profile sensitive and may be too difficult for simple DIY recycling.

warrior
21/04/2020 at 18:33
1

@ha-ng I would set those 110V heaters aside. At 220V you would be pushing 4X the power through them. If they have not fried yet, they will. Before you wire everything up, I would check things individually. The PID controller should work just fine with just the thermocouple attached. The displayed PV temperature should look right and respond to holding the TC tip in you fingers. If you set the SV to 30 C, the output light should be on and you should have low DC voltage on the output terminals of the PID. When you hold the TC tip in your fingers, the PV should rise above 30C and the output light should come off and the output voltage turn off as well. If all that works, you can connect yous SSR’s and repeat the process. If you suspect the SSR’s I would check them separately using a DC source (battery?) to activate them.

The blocks I was talking about was for mounting the TC’s to the tube. I think the original PP approach for mounting the TC calls for removing the threaded mount on the TC and clamping under the edge of the heater. I didn’t like that approach. First, the TC bead in the tip can be fragile and second, I don’t want to measure the heater temperature, I want to control on the tube temperature. So in my implementation, I used a block with a threaded hole to mount the TC using the original threaded mount and press the tip of the TC against the tube, near the heaters. The picture below shows my build. It is a little different and uses an aluminum tube. For your application I would not bother screwing the block to the tube you can just clamp it with a hose clamp and install the TC through a hole in the hose clamp. You can even just use a nut for the block. At one point there was a picture on the forum where a really clever builder used the hose clamp approach. He welded the block to the hose clamp for a very professional look but that is not needed for DIY.

Also, there have been several threads recently troubleshooting injection machine builds and electronics.

Good luck

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warrior
16/04/2020 at 04:03
2

There should be drawings and a bill of materials in the download kit. The important thing is what is available in your area. The inside one (piston) is usually a solid rod, though if you find a way to close off the end and the walls are thick enough so it does not bend, you could make a tube work. The outside tube and the band heaters you can find need to be consistent in size. As the instructions say, check the outside tube to make sure it is smooth (no weld seam). You could use aluminum if you have a good way to attach sturdy mounts.

Good luck

In reply to: Extruder

warrior
09/04/2020 at 18:22
1

The heater bands and controller/SSR/TC part of the system is probably a must buy, though you may have some heater equivalents. They are relatively cheap.

If you have a way to provide a low speed/high torque drive with your current equipment that is safe to operate, you may be able to save that part. If you search the forum, there are a lot of discussions on speed/torque/couplings.

warrior
09/04/2020 at 18:12
2

Your band heaters are rated for 110V I don’t think they will survive 230V. I also would not run them for very long in the desk top configuration, there is no temperature feedback.

With the SV higher than the PV the output light (top left, second LED down?) on the PID should be on.

I would disconnect the heaters and measure the resistance. You may have burned them out. With them disconnected, I would disconnect the 230V from the SSR’s and check that they are switching properly.

As an aside, in your diagram, you have the SSR’s connected to line without a switch. I would run them through a switch just so you can safe the entire assembly.

How do you plan to mount the thermocouples to the tube and nozzle. People have had problems with the PP approach. Using a mounting block approach may be better.

Good luck

warrior
09/04/2020 at 03:40
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Not sure if a desktop injection machine is for you? How about this machine to get you started every morning?
https://imgur.com/a/sAW0YSX

warrior
08/04/2020 at 18:20
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Let’s say you got your hands on an industrial robot. You could raise your environmental karma by sorting plastic https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/sorting-plastic-with-robotics-v4/ or you can do this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_P4xiNx-hc4 (you can skip to 2:10)

warrior
03/04/2020 at 20:45
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Thanks for posting this. @davehakkens should probably post a banner announcement and lock the forum.

Thanks for starting a new venue. The community benefits from an active forum.

In reply to: Injection pressure?

warrior
11/03/2020 at 02:06
1

If you need more pressure using the current levered design, @andyn made a clever change in his version where he could change the piston diameter without changing the tube. Of course, you trade injection volume for pressure but for small molds with narrow passages it may be an option.

In reply to: Injection pressure?

warrior
11/03/2020 at 01:47
1

It should just be the area of the piston face pushing on the plastic. In your case
I get 5.3e-4 sq meters and about 39.6 bar. I think to get to 45 bar, the PP guys eat more chocolate.

warrior
11/03/2020 at 01:10
1

Sounds like a great project. Is there a link to a more detailed description?

I’m curious what is the predominant plastic type that will be processed and what will they be making?

Thanks for posting.

In reply to: Injection pressure?

warrior
10/03/2020 at 00:22
1

Well, if you are building a machine to the specifications on that page, it states that it has a leverage of 3. So if you are 70 Kg (about 700 N) and hang of the end of the bar, you will apply 2100 N of force on the piston. If you divide that by the area of the piston in sq. meters, you will get the pressure in Pascals.
If you take more accurate measurements of the machine you are building, you will get more precise estimates for your machine.
If you need more pressure, the rack and gear designs are an alternative.

warrior
08/03/2020 at 20:00
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They should be near the heaters they control but the sensor tips should be on the thing you are trying to control the temperature of, in this case the tube and maybe the nozzle. Take a look at my description in the Dec 14 post in this thread https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/injection-molding-what-am-i-doing-wrong/#post-151288 . If you follow that approach, I would dremel a shallow dimple for the thermocouple tip to press press against. The laser should work but may not be precise enough at this temperature. A BBQ probe sensor could work as well.

warrior
08/03/2020 at 07:29
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It is hard to tell from the photo, but it looks like the thermocouples are attached to the heater bands. The tube may be cooler. Do you have a way to measure the tube temperature independently to check?

warrior
06/03/2020 at 21:45
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There are several threads on this issue like this https://davehakkens.nl/community/forums/topic/v4-fume-extraction-4/  . Looks like the V4 efforts finally started to address safety in some of the designs and documentation https://preciousplastic.com/solutions/machines/overview.html .
If you have 3 machines going at once, I would make three fume hoods extracted by a common fan and ducting. Whether you filter the exit probably depends on your local situation

warrior
01/03/2020 at 01:30
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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8042651/Depressing-images-squirrel-using-plastic-bags-build-nest.html
I guess, technically it isn’t single use plastic anymore. Now if we could set up a nuts-for-bags exchange program, the forest would get cleaned.

Viewing 30 replies - 1 through 30 (of 734 total)